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20130113
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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
. and some must-see tv. bill clinton kicks the door wide open for a hillary clinton campaign in 2016 and he makes a direct appeal, saying her health is not an issue and that he'll support whatever she decides. good morning from washington. it's wednesday, january 16th, 2013. this is "the daily rundown." i'm chuck todd. let's get right to my first reads of the morning. and it begins with guns. today the president will unveil what one gun control activist characterized nbc news as the most sweeping gun control measures proposed since right after the assassinations of bobby kennedy and mlk back in 1968. the president is going bold, fulfilling a promise he made one month ago in newtown, connecticut. >> are we really prepared to say that we're powerless in the face of such carnage? that the politics are too hard? >> the white house thinks it's better to go for broke than to lose doing something more minimalist. the president's proposals will include a combination of plans he'll ask congress to consider, but also a number of actions he can take without congress. sources familiar with the presiden
in contrast to a bill clinton or some of others. but even the president who is come in with very high ratings usually tend to plun nj the second term. twigt eisenhower, one of the most popular presidents ever in american history, by 1957 late and 15958, his ratings were down to about 40%, which was very low in those days. in a way it's an index to the fact the second term president is doing well because you want to see him spending political capital. if he leaves really popular, it may mean he hasn't done enough. >> since world war ii only presidents reagan and clinton went up in popularity? >> indeed. >> a hard act to follow and statistically you're not looking at necessarily more popularity. >> absolutely. >> people come in for a second term and think, okay, now i can relax, i don't have to campaign anymore and i can go do my business. the problem is they are focused on their legacy and things always go wrong in the second term. always, always, always. there's not a president you can mention. they have to sort of stay stay on their toes. they can't relax and just say this is my second term,
to bill clinton, george bush. and that is, obama fatigues. three years from now, people will be writing columns about obama fatigue, just as they did about clinton fatigue and bush fatigue and reagan fatigue. franklin roosevelt only gave 30 fireside chats in 12 years. he understood instinctively the dangers of overexposure. he also controlled the media to an extent that modern presidents could not hope to. host: looking back, fdr broke the unwritten code of serving more than two terms. he was elected to four terms. in today's modern age, could we have more than two terms for any president? guest: great question. >> you worked for ronald reagan. if his health was better, of course, would he have run for a third term? guest: i doubt it. he talked about it after he left office. he was going to campaign for appeal of that amendment. he thought the american people should be able to vote for anyone wanted to vote for. it is very difficult to imagine after eight years of office -- we've used up our presidents. that is why this string of two- term presidents is really so unusual. we have a stri
, for the better part of two decades. the last time west virginia and kentucky backed a democrat was bill clinton in 1996. he won west virginia by 93,000 votes and kentucky by 13,000. four years later, gore lost both states and it was a 41,000 vote gap in west virginia. more than 230,000 in kentucky. the gap got wider when john kerry lost in 2004. you see the pattern here. president obama improved on those numbers slightly in 2008, but still lost both states and his numbers fell off the table, if you will, this past november, the gap nearly doubled to 180,000 in west virginia and he lost kentucky by more than 400,000 votes. but last year, the war on coal had become a familiar theme on billboards, campaign signs and on tv. coal related donors poured more than $12 million into the campaign. 90% of it to republican, believe it or not, but to blame the president's agenda doesn't take in the bigger picture. coal production has dropped because demand is down and easily accessible coal has disappeared. low cost natural gas and fracking threatens to cut them even more. never the less, the politics of the
this up to didn't happen the first time? >> i think he'll certainly try and bill clinton talked about that directly, this system in washington which makes things so difficult but one of the most telling things, we heard a couple of minutes ago, all of this talk of the white house there's a lot of paid to doing things by executive order, executive action. not necessarily by legislative acts in congress, exactly what clinton did in 1997 when he realized that the possibility of getting things from capital hill was a little bit more limited than he hoped. >> michael, let's deal with the elephant in the room here. when at some point in the next few years donald trump succeeds in proving that obama's birth certificate's a fraud, how will that affect the ability to govern the country? no, no. i guess what i'm kind of struck by is we're talking about now few days away from the second inauguration, what are the big themes to define the obama term and seems to me maybe more than we have seen in the recent past, this second term really, the basic contours of the second term set in place. it is t
california. the first george bush from texas via connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas and the second bush from texas. so 2008 in some ways watershed election. ends the 40-year period of sun belt dominance. and there were issues that were critical in the politics that developed, that came out of the sun belt. they tended to have a conservative cast to them. tended to be oriented around issues of strong national defense, of an opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt in the south and southwest, that we see the rise of what -- by the 1970s we'll be talk about as the religious right. the rise of evangelical involvement in the process. so national defense, he was a staunch anticommunist and played an important role in right wing anticommunist politics in the late 1960s, one of the things that led him to switch parties in 1964. he was a key figure in opposing labor unions and did so long people like barry gold water. early in his career he was a staunch advocate of unions in south carolina, back in the 30s and 40s, when the union vote was an
to be streamed live on the internet was president bill clinton's in 1997. the reagan inaugural was the first held on the west front of the u.s. capitol. before, they were always on the east front, and the swearing in of fdr was the first to be held on january 20. the twentieth amendment of the constitution moved it to that date from march 4. bill clinton was sworn in as the 42nd president in 1993, january 20. he beat the first president bush in the 1992 election, in which independent candidate ross perot got about 19% of the popular vote. this is about 20 minutes. [applause] >> governor, are you ready to take the oath? >> i am. >> would you please raise your right hand? i, william jefferson clinton, do solemnly swear that i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states -- >> that i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states -- >> and will to the best of my ability preserve, protect, and defend the constitution of the united states, so help me god. >> so help me, god. >> congratulations. [cheers and applause] ♪ ["hail to the chief" plays] [gun sal
any movement on this issue? >> it is a very difficult heavy lift, chris. you think back to when bill clinton tried this in 1993. he had a large major etan of democrats in the -- majority in the house of representatives and was barely able to get anything done and now, of course, the republicans control the house of representatives. and you put your finger on it the opponents of taking additional steps tend to be much better organized and better funded. my guess is most of the action in the regulatory arena and the administration will look to see what they can do on their own absent much prospect for legislation. >> chris: i want to broad then legislation. mr. weather iwhether it is the fiscal cliff or gun control or a major immigration reform movement by the president. he seems to be as he prepares for his inaugural a more combative president, more confrontational and less interested even in the beginning in compromise. one, do you agree? and two, what does that say to you about prospects for his second term? >> i think it is interesting because the president was elected in '08 by a
to when bill clinton tried it in 1993, a large majority of democrats in the house of representatives and was barely able to get anything done and now the republicans control the house of representatives and you put your finger on it, those taking additional steps, they are better organized and funded than the advocates and my best guess is most of the action here will be in the regulatory arena and the administration will look to see what they can do on their own, absent much prospect ultimately for significant legislation. >> chris: i want to broaden the conversation, because, whether the fiscal cliff or gun control, story of the day about a major immigration reform movement by the president, he seems to be, as he prepares for the inaugural, a more combative president, more confrontational, less interested even in the beginning in compromise. one, do you agree and, two, what does it say to you about prospects for his second term. >> i do and it is interesting. he was elected in by a more significant margin, notably more significant margin than he was reelected. he was not nearly the
. in the way we know him. our reminder -- i am reminded about the story of bill and hillary clinton when they returned to little rock, ark. the president had a favorite mustang he'd like to drive and the secret service would not let him drive it. he went back to little rock and secret service follow them. they pulled into a gas station to get some gas and there was an old guys who had gone to high school with bill and hillary. there he was pumping gas and bill says, "look what would have happened if you married him." hillary said, "if i would have married him, he would have been the president." [laughter] [applause] i raise that, and that calls for some and modesty on your part, but i raise that because i know that you were there for dr. king in a way that we will never know or appreciate. i talked to a lot of dr. king's lieutenants and they will tell you that because he was human and not divine, although we think he was divine, he was just a man. an extraordinary man, but a man. he would get depressed and disappointed about all kinds of things related to the movement. tell me what you w
, and pat caddell, former pollster for president jimmy carter, and doug schoen, form pollster for bill clinton. john kerry has a lock. he is a member the boys' club. the others? >> there will be issues and challenges with all three. if i had to bet i bet they all are confirmed and that hagel will be the toughest but ultimately will get through. the larger issue, with brennan going to c.i.a. and with jack lew going to treasury this is the effective consolidation of the white house and the president directly over treasury and c.i.a. and c.i.a. nominally an independent agency. >>gregg: these are corner -- cronies? >> yes and it is worrisome. >>gregg: pat, especially hagel who has said to republicans, troubling things about iran, hamas, hezbollah. >> said troubling things to democrats and not just republicans and he will be the most problematic. we see president obama and his chief of staff will either be biden's or the deputy of tom donnalyn, all white males, to drop the mask of pretense of bipartisanship, pushing the agenda through and the discussion each of them is what we can do in ter
: lowering the bar. host: this is from an interview in 1998 when bill clinton was in the white house and the nominee for the u.s. ambassador of an openly gay individual. chuck hagel said, "there representing america. they're representing our lifestyle, our values, our standards. and i think it is an inhibiting factor to be gay, openly, aggressively day, like mr. hormel, to do an effective job." he is saying those remarks were ill founded. guest: if he gets through the senate, he will be the secretary of defense. he is not in a domestic policy position. i think his record on domestic issues, whether they be guns or abortion or gay rights, there are other things like votes against various positions in the u.s. military having to do with a rights, naacp had very low marks for his civil rights record, all of which raises the question of why the president would want him. again, i get back to this issue that i think the senate committee has to pay attention to, which is, given the record, and given the fact the president was not interested in backing susan rice, why is he so dead set on ha
with ronald reagan, bill clinton and dwight eisenhower. >> the greatest honor history can bestow is the title of peacemaker. this honor beacon's americans the chance to lead the world at last out of the valley of term oil and onto the high ground of peace that man has dreamed of since the dawn of civilization. >> making the benefits of scientific examinations and -- scientific advances for the improvement of undeveloped areas. story.ic radio's back live saturday morning at 11:00 eastern, part of three days of american history tv rights to inauguration day on c-span 3. >> in 1981, ronald reagan was inaugurated. he had won the 1980 election against jimmy carter. a major issue in the campaign was the iran hostage crisis. as president reagan was giving his address, they were being released. this is about 25 minutes. [applause] >> governor, are you prepared to take the constitutional oath. raise your right hand and repeat after me. i robberies in do solemnly swear -- >> i,-- ronald reagan do solemnly swear -- >> that i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states -- >> and
: this is from an interview back in 1998 when bill clinton was in the white house. chuck hagel said, "they are representing america. they are representing our lifestyle, our values, our standards. and i think it is an inhibiting factor to be gay -- openly aggressively gave like mr. hormel -- to do an effective job." he has since apologized for those remarks. guest: he is not in the domestic policy division as secretary of defense. i think domestic issues, whether it be guns or abortion or gay rights, -- it is not just that ", but the way. -- it is not just that quote by the way. all of which raises the question of why the president would want him. i think the senate committee in particular have to pay attention to -- given that record, why was the president backing susan rice? why is he so dead set on having senator hagel be secretary of defense? i think he is somebody the president really trust to re- trench the american power. there is going to be a fundamental choice made for the next four years. his nomination is just beginning of that debate. host: isn't figuring where you want to mov
with ronald reagan's 1981 inauguration. bill clinton and his first from 1993. dwight eisenhower after that, 1957. at 9:00 p.m. harry truman's 1949 inauguration. richard nixon from 1969. ronald reagan, also john f. kennedy after that from 1961, obviously. george h.w. bush in his 1989 inauguration. linden johnson follows that. jimmy carter from 1977. we finish up with george w. bush from 1991. all of that getting under way tomorrow night at 8:00 p.m. eastern. >> we'll start sunday at 10:30 a.m. eastern with your calls and more and a look back at the president's 2009 inaugural dress. and then on monday the public inaugural ceremonies. our coverage starts at 7:00 a.m. the swearing-in is at noon. we'll cover that. the luncheon, the parade and more. and throughout the day of course you can continue to join us by phone, facebook and twitter. we're using the #inaug2013. while we wait for vice president joe biden we will go back to the issue of reducing gun violence in a round table discussion from this morning's "washington journal." host: this morning we've been talking with gun owners and getti
the optimism -- technology sector? what are the lessons that come from this? the other day bill clinton was saying we cannot really expect our businesses to compete internationally if they only have access to the speed of curia. he is right. rolee outline technology's and repositioning the u.s. as the world's innovation leader tonight on the communicators at 8:00 eastern on c-span2. >> now the new america foundation discussing the status of the guantanamo bay detention center. last week was the 11th anniversary of the opening. >> welcome to the new america foundation. it is the 11th anniversary of the opening of guantanamo. we have an exceptionally well- informed, to talk about that. we have pretty much the same group, exactly the same group speaking in this room one year ago. i asked and the worthington how many people have been released since the event one year ago and the answer is four there is still 166 detainees at guantanamo the question that this panel -- the big question is -- is the obama administration moving towards a policy of indefinite detention? first up to speak will be
a new york city hospital following treatment for a blood clot. many lawmakers demanding clinton testify about the terror attack in benghazi before voting on her potential successor, nominee senator john kerry. google chairman eric schmidt and former new mexico governor bill richardson arriving in north korea. his visit drawing criticism from the state department because it comes only weeks after a controversial north korean rocket launch. the delegation defends its trip to the communist nation. >> this is a private humanitarian visit. we're here as individual american citizens, looking at the humanitarian situation. we're gonna ask about the american detainee who's here. we're interested in the economic and political situation. >> schmidt is the highest-profile u.s. executive to visit north korea, a country with notoriously restrictive online policies since young leader kim jong-un took power a year ago. for "teen kids news," i'm lauren green, "fox news channel in the classroom." >> wisdom is handed down from generation to generation. but sometimes, so is misinformation. eden has the fa
's unclear if anything has been proposed forty. but a similar bill failed in 2011. a former army staff sergeant known for his epic valor in the afghan war is the fourth living recipient for actions in iraq or afghanistan. president obama will present the award to clinton ramesha next month, saying me and fellow soldiers were surrounded by dozens of enemy fighters and fought back bravely and he took out an enemy machine gun team, despite his injuries. coming up, ousted egyptian president hosni mubarak tries to get out of a life sentence for allowing protesters to be murdered. and feverish, coughing, achy flu is sweeping the country. it is not too late to get the flu shot. but is it still available? officemax has exactly the ink... your business needs... at prices that keep you...out of the red. this week get a bonus $15 itunes gift card with any qualifying $75 ink purchase. find thousands of big deals now... at officemax. [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it... in your heart. [ basketball
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)